See

Business

23 March 2016

René Boivin, masculin-feminine brand

René Boivin: in fact, behind the name of this prized French jeweler hid a team of women.

 

 

“A ladies’ workshop”

In auctions and at dealers, collectors hunt down René Boivin jewelry, a family business that took off around 1905. It’s often not made clear that most of the pieces were not made by him as he died 1917, but by women. Françoise Cailles, author of the only book on this house, also qualifies it as a “ladies’ workshop”.

 

Jeanne Boivin

After World War II, his wife Jeanne continued its innovative spirit with unusual contrasts in wood and diamond, rock crystal and fine colored stones, such as purple amethysts, sapphires and green peridots, just to name a few. She also favored yellow gold in a period when platinum and highly structured forms were in full vogue. She oversaw everything in a highly demanding way, including production. This explains why Boivin jewelry appears as though made by a single pair of hands making the pieces easily identifiable at first glance.

 

Suzanne Belperron

The second surprising woman in the history of this house is the designer Suzanne Belperron. For over ten years she worked closely with Jeanne Boivin, to the point where we don’t really know who did what, and which of the two women came up with the ideas. In 1932, Suzanne Belperron quit the establishment to found her own house (today resurrected by Landrigan US) because, it is said, she could not put her name to the jewelry…

 

Juliette Moutard

Then followed Juliette Moutard, a bird-lover who perpetuated the structured forms and Etruscan influences so dear to the house. She had a lot of humor and spirit, visible for example in her cheeky bestiary. She embodied the ideas of Jeanne Boivin who loved the sea, with for example, the hinged starfish. Then, she went on to work with a newcomer, René Boivin’s daughter.

 

The female trio would perpetuate the Boivin style up until the 1970s and make their mark in the history of jewelry, until then almost entirely dominated by men.

 

Related articles:

Olivier Baroin, the expert of Suzanne Belperron

The Suzanne Belperron phenomenon

Where can I find Suzanne Belperron jewelry?

Most popular articles

Urgent: polishers wanted!

Jewelry houses are suffering from a grim lack of manpower, especially for polishing – a crucial step in the manufacture of jewelry. By Sandrine...

Out of the mine into the shop window

Thanks to the purchase of rough stones, jewelers can customize the size of their most beautiful gems. It is also one solution to the challenge of traceability.

Nicolas Bos, CEO of Van Cleef & Arpels : passing on the skills and expertise of jewelry and know-how

The preservation and passing on of jewelry skills and know-how are major challenges in terms of helping French jewelers develop and grow their influence....

Coming soon: 5 new ways to discover jewelry in museums!

The last Museum Connection trade fair showcased the extraordinary innovations setting the museum world alight. It’s time to apply some of that craziness...

Sophie D'Agon's digital business model

Having launched her Sophie D’Agon jewelry brand five years ago, Sophie Lepourry tells us about the digital strategy that led to her success and the opening...

Branded vs non-branded jewelry: the low-down

One figure keeps coming up in studies on the global jewelry market: only 20% of the necklaces, rings, bracelets and earrings sold in the world are branded...